paris close november 2017 tbr reading list

Paris Close’s November 2017 Reading List: Natalie Díaz, Katie Kitamura + More

Paperback Paris

A somber reading list for somber weather.

Ah, it feels good to be back in the swing of making more reading attempts as the year draws to a close. I went through a vicious purging phase over the past couple of weeks trying to eliminate all the books I would most likely never read in my life and I did such a fabulous job!

What remained was still an impressive collection of (mostly unread) books on my mantel, and with this reading list, I am hoping to break my reading slump cycle to prep me for more vigorous reading goals next year. With that, here are the books I plan on tackling this November.

 

When My Brother Was an Aztec, Natalie Díaz
Synopsis: “I write hungry sentences,” Natalie Diaz once explained in an interview, “because they want more and more lyricism and imagery to satisfy them.” This debut collection is a fast-paced tour of Mojave life and family narrative: A sister fights for or against a brother on meth, and everyone from Antigone, Houdini, Huitzilopochtli, and Jesus is invoked and invited to hash it out. These darkly humorous poems illuminate far corners of the heart, revealing teeth, tails, and more than a few dreams.

Thoughts: As always, I am so intrigued by all the wonderful books I find through Goodreads browsing. This year, albeit a fruitless one for any reading goals I sought to achieve, has been filled with pretty decent works of fiction. However, I’ve yet to read an entire poetry collection in full, and but I noticed Diaz’s collection When My Brother Was an Aztec the other night and I was completely taken with one of her poems a lion consuming a man who entered its cage, an odd reflection, but one that perfectly described a feeling of entrapment I couldn’t avert my eyes from. That said, I am all in.

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the authorParis Close
Editor-in-chief at Paperback Paris. Saving myself for Andy Cohen. Give me Gillian Flynn, or give me death.